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PaellaThis recipe is adapted from a recipe published by the Vegetarian Society for their theme of ‘Share’ for this year’s National Vegetarian Week.  It was pretty simple to cook, filling and very tasty – perfect for sharing, in fact.

And to celebrate the week, DON’T FORGET to make a comment on the site to be in with a chance of winning a copy of Early Vegetarian Recipes!

Veggie Paella with Purple Sprouting Broccoli

200g Brown basmati rice
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
30g flaked almonds
1tblsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
200g purple sprouting broccoli
50g black pitted olives
200g button mushrooms, sliced
1 tblsp tomato puree
10 cherry tomatoes, halved

Put the rice and turmeric in a large pan of water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile toast the almonds in a dry pan for 2 – 3 minutes.  In a separate frying pan, heat the oil and gently fry the onion for 5 minutes.  Add the garlic and broccoli and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Then add the mushrooms, olives and tomato puree and cook for 5 more minutes.

Add the cooked rice to the frying pan, mixing well and stir in the tomatoes.  Served sprinkled with the toasted almonds.

cornbreadlgeThis delicious cornbread is a great addition to the bread basket and a fantastic gluten-free staple.  It’s especially good as an accompaniment to spicy soups or a chilli, but is also perfect for breakfast with just some tangy marmalade.

This quantity made one loaf in a 20cm square tin, and 12 mini muffins.  if you do this remember the muffins only need half the cooking time of the loaf.  If you make this quantity into one large loaf, you will need to increase the cooking time to approx. 30 minutes.

DON’T FORGET to make a comment to enter and win a copy of Early Vegetarian Recipes.

Gluten Free Cornbread

2 eggs
450ml natural yoghurt
50g butter, melted
65g plain gluten free flour
1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
2 tsp salt
275g fine cornmeal

Preheat the oven to 200C / 300F / Gas 6.  Grease and line the baking tin and grease the muffin tins.

Whisk the eggs in a bowl until they are frothy.  Add the yoghurt and melted butter and whisk until combined.

Sift in the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt, and stir in well.

Fold in the cornmeal, ensuring it is fully mixed in.  Divide the mixture into the tins.  Cook the muffins for approximately 10 minutes and the loaf for about 20 minutes.  They should be slightly browned when cooked and spring back when gently pressed.

cornbreadsm

share-banner-newNext week is National Vegetarian Week in the UK and the theme this year is ‘Share’.  So in keeping with the spirit of the week, I’ll be sharing (or giving away) a copy of my book, ‘Early Vegetarian Recipes’!  All you have to do to enter is make a comment on this blog by Thursday 21st May and your name will be put in the hat!  The winner announced and contacted for their postal address on Friday 22nd May. Good Luck

early-veg-recipes

red veined sorrelI’m a great believer that good gardening is easy gardening.  This could be because I’m lazy and I’m certainly short of time to spend in the garden.  But surely, working with nature, rather than fighting against it is best, and the plants which thrive in your garden are the ones that most belong there.

A few years ago, I bought a pot of red-veined sorrel at a farmers market.  I transferred the plant to a bigger pot, added a few leaves to a salad every so often, then completely neglected the plant over the winter.  But then the plant seeded itself in the garden, popping up in several places, and generally thriving like a weed.  Not only that, but the slugs seem to leave it alone.

Now all of that seems to me like the peak of gardening success.  And this sorrel has the added advantage of being an attractive plant wherever it chooses to settle.

The young sorrel leaves have a lemony, lettuce like flavour and look good in a mixed leaf salad, while older, more bitter leaves, can be cooked like spinach.  Nutritionally, sorrel provide vitamin C and iron, so more than worth the (non) effort involved!

seedlings

Even growing your own veg can cause dilemmas for the vegetarian gardener.  As a vegetarian for example, I’ve never bought organic compost for my small fruit and vegetable plot, as it usually contains blood and bone-meal.  So I was delighted to discover this vegan organic compost, and use it for planting seeds.  That’s one problem solved.  Just looking forward to tasting the results now!

Vegan organic compost from Fertile Fibre.

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