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PaellaThis recipe is adapted from a recipe published by the Vegetarian Society for their theme of ‘Share’ for this year’s National Vegetarian Week.  It was pretty simple to cook, filling and very tasty – perfect for sharing, in fact.

And to celebrate the week, DON’T FORGET to make a comment on the site to be in with a chance of winning a copy of Early Vegetarian Recipes!

Veggie Paella with Purple Sprouting Broccoli

200g Brown basmati rice
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
30g flaked almonds
1tblsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
200g purple sprouting broccoli
50g black pitted olives
200g button mushrooms, sliced
1 tblsp tomato puree
10 cherry tomatoes, halved

Put the rice and turmeric in a large pan of water, bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile toast the almonds in a dry pan for 2 – 3 minutes.  In a separate frying pan, heat the oil and gently fry the onion for 5 minutes.  Add the garlic and broccoli and cook for a further 5 minutes.  Then add the mushrooms, olives and tomato puree and cook for 5 more minutes.

Add the cooked rice to the frying pan, mixing well and stir in the tomatoes.  Served sprinkled with the toasted almonds.


The reason I ended up writing ‘Early Vegetarian Recipes’ was because of a lady called Florence George, a cookery teacher and writer from the early 20th century.  She just happened to have a been a teacher at my old school (slightly before I attended.  Obviously), who wrote a book called ‘Vegetarian Cookery’ in 1908.  It was while looking for her book in the British Library that I discovered the other wonderful vegetarian writers of the time.

I’ve now discovered a book, published by the school (King Edward VI High School), which looks at the life of Florence George and the history of cookery teaching in schools.  It’s a fascinating story as Florence was one of the first teachers to attend the National Training School of Cookery in London.

A large portion of the book is devoted to recipes, including a section of vegetarian recipes.  They are mostly simple recipes as you would expect from a school collection, but there’s plenty  here for adults looking for something quick and easy.  These tasty chick pea croquettes fall into that category.

chickpeafritters

Chick Pea Croquettes

1 1/2 lb cooked chick peas
2 cloves garlic
2 tblspns chopped parsley
1 medium potato, cooked
1 tblspn soy sauce (use tamari for wheat free recipe)
squeeze lemon juice
seasoning
flour for coating (use gluten free)
vegetable oil for frying

Mash the chick peas with the garlic and potato.  Add parsley, soy sauce, lemon juice and seasoning and mix well.

Roll the mixture into croquette of fritter shapes, then into the flour.  Cool in the fridge for 1 hour if possible.  Fry the croquettes or brush with oil before cooking under the grill.

Recipes for Success: 125 Years of Cookery at King Edward VI High School for Girls by Sally Huxley

This being National Vegetarian Week, it’s a good time to think about getting hold of some new recipes.  The Vegetarian Society’s new free Receipe App is now available, with a collection of over 700 recipes.

Veg soc recipe app

The app is suitable for android and iphones and is easy to download from Google or Apple.  I particularly like the search function which allows you to select by diet type as well as meal type, or occasion.  By choosing both gluten-free and vegan, I got an impressive 200 recipes returned.  I can then keep those in place while I search for Christmas main course (7 suggestions),  or Greek starter (3 suggestions).  I also like the way you can search according to cooking ability, from simple recipes up to caterer level.  An extra keyword facility allows you to search by ingredient.  The layout is good – clear and easy to use.  I think this app is great inspiration for veggies and the perfect answer to anyone who asks ‘What can I cook for a vegetarian?’

Photo: bbc.co.uk

If you’re in the UK at the moment, it can’t have escaped your notice that we are witnessing an outbreak of patriotic flag waving!  This weekend sees a four day national party as we celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.  Elizabeth II has been on the throne for 60 years and it seems that the only way to respond, apart from flag waving, is to start baking.  There are some fabulous looking concoctions out there, so get out your pinnies and start baking – do it for your country!

The BBC have several wonderful recipes for themed cakes as well as ideas for a jolly good street party.  Check out the Union Jack Battenburg (above) and the Jubilee Bunting cake (below).

Jubilee Bunting Cake. bbc.co.uk

Other great bakes:

 

Jubilee Cake from The Boy Who Bakes

Crown Cakes on Baking Mad

 

 

It seems that even in the 18th and 19th Centuries, the world of cookery books was dominated by celebrity chefs, when cooks employed by royalty or those who ran famous eating houses were the main beneficiaries of the boom in the publishing of cookbooks.  There was also a rise in the number of vegetarian cookbooks published during the 19th Century and the writers of those were often already known too.  Mrs Bowdich for example, who published ‘New Vegetarian Recipes’ in 1892, was the owner of a vegetarian restaurant on Gray’s Inn Road in London.

To celebrate all this, the Keats House Museum in London has been showing an exhibition of the period’s celebrity cookbooks, from the collection at the Guildhall Library.  This coming weekend is the last chance to see the exhibition as it closes on 26th February.

This is a recipe from one of the featured books ‘The Complete Confectioner’ by Frederick Nutt, and what I love about this is the instruction to include carraway seeds, ‘as many as you think proper’!

Judges Biscuits by Frederick Nutt, 1819

Take six eggs and break them into copper pan, yolks and whites together, whisk them well for above five minutes, mix half a pound of powdered sugar with the eggs, and whisk them for ten minutes, put as many carraway seeds as you think proper, and half a pound of sifted flour, mix it well with a wooden spoon, and put three papers on your plates; then take a spoon and drop them on papers about the size of a crown-piece, sift some powdered sugar over them, let them be rather thick in the middle, and the oven rather sharp, and when they come out, cut them off the paper while hot.

Keats House Museum

Regency ‘Celebrity’ Cookbooks
Keats House Museum 
until 26th February 2012
Keats Grove, Hampstead, London NW3 2RR UK

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